Greens with Eggs

Ignore the pork

When James Oseland names a dish his favorite over the past year, I tend to sit up and take notice. I don’t know about being my favorite, but this dish was a pleaser. Ignore the ham in the photo above. This shot was taken with the leftovers, which I foolishly added home-cured Canadian Bacon to. I shouldn’t have. This dish was absolutely great without it, and the smokiness ruined it the second time around. The original version also didn’t call for heirloom tomatoes, but I had a bunch on hand with no plans so I threw them in. I happen to love tomatoes cooked like this, so I liked them. If you do not, or if you don’t have any on hand, feel free to omit.

Greens with Eggs
Adapted from Wild Greens with Fried Eggs (Horta me Avga Tiganita) from Saveur

Extra virgin olive oil
5 scallions, minced
8 oz. cut n clean seasonal cooking greens
1/2 c. flat leaf parsley, chopped
1/2 c. mint leaves, chopped
1/4 c. fennel fronds, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 eggs per person
Double handful heirloom cherry tomatoes
Crusty bread, sliced on a bias and toasted (optional)

Heat 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the scallions and cook for 4 minutes, until soft. add the greens, parsley, mint, fennel, garlic, tomatoes and 1/2 c. water; salt & pepper to taste. Cook, stirring as needed, until the greens are tender and tomatoes have softened and split, 10-15 mins.

In a medium pan, heat a turn and a half around the pan of olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Crack your eggs (1 person’s at a time) into the skillet and fry by constantly spooning hot oil over the yolks until the yolks are just set, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel to de-grease and then onto your greens to serve. Serve with crusty bread.

My first batch of eggs I cooked a little longer than the second, and I actually enjoyed that more. The eggs were still a little runny, and the whites were nice and fried. Cook as you like.

Serves 2

Playing with Portraits 3

Just so my home page doesn’t look like a stalker page (and I needed a change of scenery), I decided to switch things up a bit with today’s Photoshopped portrait post.

This should be the last one for awhile–I’ve managed to work my way through most of the pile of portrait tutorials I have found interesting over the past few months but have been too lazy to try out.

Original Shot

This is the original shot I started out with today.

High Key Black & White

This is the final version–a high key black & white shot. Not bad, if I do say so myself, though the effect might be more interesting in a shot with less contrast.

Enter one of my beautiful sisters in law, Kim. We took a bunch of pictures of family this Thanksgiving, and this has to be one of my favorites. Not only is my sister in law a looker, she’s also a talented photographer (among other things like mom, planetary do-gooder, super smart and a professor to boot) and very easy to take pictures of.

Original

This is the original shot.

High Key

I blew this shot out making it high key and I kind of like the effect. I might keep that in mind for the future and do a really blown out set.

Metallic

This effect increases the grunge, making the picture almost metallic looking. This I will definitely keep in mind, since this is just about the effect I was after when looking for tutorials in the first place. What I was initially looking for before getting waylaid was how to make photos look like the History Channel’s new shows, specifically the deep blacks and interesting contrast on American Pickers. So, maybe the effect is just on the show’s main title sequence and hasn’t made the transition to stills. A quick Google search pulled up plenty of great pics of Danielle (and her tatts), but not exactly what I was looking for. If you haven’t seen the show, you’ll just have to imagine.

Old Hollywood Glamor

This is the old Hollywood glamor shot effect and I rather like the results, especially for portraits of women Soft focus hides a multitude of sins, and I just may go back and dig up a few shots of myself to apply this technique to.

The Takeaway

What has this little exercise taught me? I need to take more pictures of people! Macro is great, and food is endlessly fascinating and all, but people. I need more people. That, and that Photoshop is a really useful tool for creating interesting, artistic portraits. I already knew that, only now I won’t be quite so lost with a few helpful processes under my belt.

Playing with Portraits Of My Dearest Part 2

Original

Original shot.

Light fixing

Light photo correction, mainly exposure and levels.

Warm Version

Warmed up a bit.

Vintage Wash

Curves adjusted for a vintage wash.

Vamped Out

In this version, I used a mask to make his skin lighter for a washed-out (sloppy) vamp effect.

Depth

This version looks a lot like the warm version, just achieved a different way.

Dinner with Friends: Sra. Martinez

Fresh Tapas

This is a pictorial from our recent dinner/impromptu photo shoot at Sra. Martinez.

Pig logo in frosted glass

We decided to have another in our continuing ‘foodies with cameras’ quest with our good friend Kevin and man, we weren’t disappointed. Some of the pictures I took turned out like crap, but the food didn’t and that is what counts.

Table bread with a light, fruity olive oil

Egg Yolk Carpaccio with Sweet Shrimp and Crispy Potatoes

*Homer drool* Runny yolks....

This dish had me at egg yolk. I’m in an admitted lifelong torrid love affair with eggs, but this dish is good even if you are not.

What looks simple (almost like Mee Krob at first glance) turns into a rich, velvety sweet/salty/soft/crunchy flavor riot after gently scooping the egg yolk up from the bottom of the dish and ladling it over the mound of crispy potato and soft sweet shrimp. The salty sweetness of the shrimp balances perfectly with the crunch of the potatoes and the deeply satisfying richness of the yolks. A winner in our book.

Roasted Bone Marrow with Schwarma Spice, Sumac Pickled Onions, Apple Butter and Toast

All I can say is... cow butter. That's what bone marrow tastes like.

This dish elicited more than a few spontaneous exclamations of “holy shit!” it was so good. If you haven’t had the wonder that is bone marrow, the nearest thing I can liken it to would be cow butter. I’ve stayed far away from bone marrow until now, slightly frightened by the consistency I imagined and horrified by the fat content. No more. This was fabulous. I didn’t get much of the spice, but I think that was the point. The onions lent a nice texture change, and combined with a light schmear of the apple butter… forget about it. This is not Amish country apple butter. It’s velvety, has a hint of apple freshness and gives a nice little counterpoint to the richness of the marrow.

Croquetas with Jamon, Manchego and Fig Marmalade

The fig marmalade is what really made these beauties sing

This is perhaps the best representation of a perennial Miami favorite–the croquetta. Tender nuggets of soft potato protect salty Jamon and creamy Manchego cheese. What really did it for us with this dish was the fig marmalade. The sweet, slightly sour tang gave the ham a nice punch.

Cauliflower Steak with Marcona Almonds and Golden Raisins

So good it made even my sweet-with-savory hating DH love it

The chef had even my sweet-with-savory-hating husband singing this dish’s praises. The nuttiness of the cauliflower really balanced the plump sweetness of the raisins, and the simply treated almonds gave their all for a really nice, well-balanced (and very needed) vegetable component to our feast.

Garbanzo Stew with Chorizo, Kale, Tetilla Cheese and Quail Egg

This picture sucks, but I just couldn't leave it off. This dish was just too good.

Possibly my favorite of the night, this dish’s dead simple looks hide it’s complex flavors and wholly satisfying comfort. This is Spanish comfort food at its finest, with the best chorizo I’ve had in town. This isn’t the under-seasoned or mealy stuff–this is the good stuff. All richness, complex flavors and nice meaty texture–what all chorizo aspires to be. I need to learn how to make a passable version of this dish, and pronto.

Lamb Pinchos with Romesco and Grilled Scallions

The picture isn't the best, but you just can't go wrong with lamb chops

Perfectly cooked lamb lollipops with just enough sear to be interesting, and a velvety romesco sauce. Although I almost missed the deeply seared fat cap I only barely trim off when I cook lamb, this was a great rendition, and a little better for you as well.

Bacon Wrapped Rabbit with Carrot Risotto, Glazed Carrot Pearls and Pork Jus

The risotto and carrot pearls are what did it for me in this dish. The rabbit was great, but I wanted to curl up with a tub of the risotto Oh yeah, you heard me right. Carrot pearls and pork jus. A lot of love went into this dish. What is a carrot pearl, you might ask? It’s a tiny perfect sphere of crunchy carrot scooped out by hand by a poor sous chef. Love.

You can certainly taste the love in this dish. The rabbit is most, if a bit on the overwhelmed side by the bacon, the risotto with pork jus is so good I wanted a huge bowl of it, and the pearls? They give just the right amount of crunch to give you something to ponder.

Pastelito de Membrillo y Queso with Quince, …..

Long name that should translate to frickin awesome

I didn’t get the whole name of the dessert, but it was nothing short of amazing. Vanilla and possibly rum? ice cream topped with a flag of salty, crispy Jamon ham and deeply toasted nuts on one side with a fried pastry hiding a surprising pocket of soft cheese and sweet quince at the other. This dish walks the line between sweet and savory beautifully, serving as a great reminder that cheese can make one hell of a dessert dish.

There was another dessert–churros so good I had no idea they were supposed to taste like that. But, the sun went down, the lighting failed, and I just wasn’t able to get a usable shot. Guess we’ll just have to go back 🙂

Table light

Decor Shots

Back wall near the bar

Sra. Martinez is located in a 1920s old Post Office, and is decked out in rich black wood and gorgeous patterned tile with hits of reds, yellows and citrus. The decor supports the playful colors of the dishes perfectly and serves to give a sense of lightness and air.

Water bottles lined up and ready for service
Lighting over the bar. I ❤ Edison style filaments!
Bright punches of citrus are not only pretty, they're also practical at the bar
Heading Upstairs
Upstairs lighting

Service

Hands down the best service I have had to date in Miami; possibly ever. Everyone we spoke to was knowledgeable and gracious, attentive without being overbearing, and more than willing to talk about dishes you could tell they were very proud of. We left feeling not only well taken care of, but like we had a better picture of what the Chef had intended. That’s rare and something very worthwhile indeed. Food is a topic I never tire of, and it’s nice to get background on something I spend so much of my time thinking (and writing) about.

Overall Impressions

I’m looking for something less than stellar to say about Sra. Martinez. A little qualm; something I would change about the dishes we had, and I can’t. The only things I can say even remotely negative are nitpicky. And you know what? I’m no where near this level of chef, so that is ok. I’m great at home, but for an audience? I think not. I’ve been trying for a day now to see if my amazement will dim with time, and so far it’s not happening. This place is amazing.

I think I enjoyed it more than Michy’s and even though it really, really pains me to say it… more even than Michael’s Genuine. Granted, they’re two different kinds of food (both tapas style, but from two different cultural backgrounds), so there is definitely room for both in the pantheon of kickass food in Miami. I still think Michael’s is where I will take out of town not necessarily foodie friends, but those foodie visitors? watch out, you’re in for a treat.

With Sra. Martinez, you can tell each dish has been thought about and thought about and tested and loved long before it gets to your plate. Think of it as a love letter from Chef Bernstein to Miami. She is at the top of her game with this place, and I can’t wait to go back for brunch. Not to detract from Michy’s, which is also stellar, but at Sra. Martinez you can relax more–maybe it’s the dark woods and high ceilings, maybe not. I guess this will just give me a good excuse to go back soon so I can tell for sure 🙂

Read the full review on Foodie In Miami

View all the shots we took that night on Flickr

Follow Kevin (@Fuji27) on Twitter and maybe get an invite to view his shots from the night (if you’re very lucky)

Black Sesame Walnut Noodles

Rabbit poo? Nope. Black sesame seeds, which play a starring role in today’s recipe.

This dish is adapted from Heidi Swanson’s recipe for Black Sesame Otsu from her upcoming book, Super Natural Everyday. If you haven’t visited her food blog (101 Cookbooks) before, go. She is one of my favorite healthy food recipe authors and I can’t wait to get my hands on her new book.

This dish is everything you want in a Spring dinner–nice and light-tasting, not too heavy and packed with green leafy goodness. The only change I would make next time would be adding more cayenne. 2 big pinches just wasn’t enough for us.

Now on to the goodness that is a bowl of Japanese noodles.

Black Sesame Walnut Noodles

1/2 c. walnuts, shelled
1/2 c. black sesame seeds (note: these will end up looking like coffee grounds. If that bothers you, use white sesame seeds)
1 1/2 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 1/2 Tbsp. shoyu
1 1/2 tsp. mirin
1 Tbsp. sesame oil
2 Tbsp. rice (sushi) vinegar
2 big pinches cayenne pepper
12 oz. soba noodles
1 bunch Swiss chard
1 bunch green onions, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced
Handful Chinese chives, chopped (optional)

Put a large pot of salted water on to boil.

Toast the walnuts in a dry pan over medium-high heat until they begin to release their aroma and are lightly toasted. Don’t forget to shake the pan regularly to avoid burnt spots. Add the sesame seeds and toast for only a minute or so, until they smell toasted. Be careful not to over-toast!

Transfer the nuts to a mortar & pestle or bowl of a food processor. Crush until the mixture looks like black sand. Add the sugar, shoe, miring, sesame oil, vinegar and cayenne. Stir to combine and taste for seasoning.

Wash and slice your chard into thin ribbons.

When the water is boiling, add the soba and cook according to package directions until tender (about 3 minutes). In the last minute or so of cooking, add the chard and stir.

When your noodles are tender and the chard is nicely cooked, drain, reserving about a cup of the cooking liquid. Rinse under cold water to stop the cooking.

Reserve some of the sesame paste and the chives for a garnish. Scoop the rest into a large mixing bowl and thin with 1/3 c. of the reserved cooking liquid to form a sauce.

Add everything else to the bowl and toss until combined. Serve topped with the reserved sesame paste and chives.

Serves 2 for dinner, with enough left over for a nice lunch.

Eastern North Carolina Cheese Biscuits

Awwww… look. The shape was totally unplanned, but I do heart these biscuits.

I’ve been a bit nostalgic for one of the places I’ve called home lately. It started with a listing I ran across of Saveur Magazine’s Top 100. Biscuitville made the list! I love Biscuitville! I miss biscuits! We don’t really have Southern-style biscuits in Miami.

This led to a Facebook conversation with an old friend about the biscuits we loved from my college days in Eastern North Carolina. These biscuits were the bomb-diggety and almost ubiquitous on campus, as well as in little local gas stations and breakfast joints (the top examples for me being the The Wright Place on East Carolina University’s main campus and a little ghetto gas station on the outskirts of known town we used to frequent just for the biscuits and cheap cigarettes). This led the Facebook friend and I on an Internet-wide search for the perfect Eastern North Carolina biscuit, which in turn led to stumbling upon a fight that has been raging for ages on the subject on Chowhound. It seems no one can agree on a recipe, or even if the hyper-local biscuits even exist. They *do* exist. And apparently we aren’t the only ex-East Carolinians who remember them with fondness.

These are not Red Lobster-style cheddar biscuits, though (as legend has it) those hail from the Carolinas too. These biscuits are huge (bigger than your hand or cat head sized as some call it), have a nice dense crumb with slightly crispy outside from touching the sides of the pan and come with a thick layer of gooey cheddar-like orange melty cheese in the center. Not, I repeat, Not mixed in with the batter. Those are indeed some great biscuits, but not what I’m talking about here. You might ask, what’s the big freaking deal? They’re biscuits with cheese in the middle. Pop open a can of Pillsbury and be done with it. To which I’d retort, blasphemer! Those aren’t the same thing at. all. These, aside from dipped in nostalgia, are flaky yet toothsome, gooey from the cheese, almost greasy to the touch, and satisfying to the core. These are cheese biscuits that don’t even need a fried egg, country ham or bacon to be good. And that, my friends, is a feat in and of itself.

A note on cheese: Proponents of the biscuit gospel call for something called a “hoop cheese”. According to Wikipedia, hoop cheese is a firm dry cheese made from milk alone and is popular throughout the rural South. I can believe this, though the cheese I remember is more cheddar-like, so I found a nice stout cheddar to slice. What you’re looking for is a good melty cheese that can stand up to a buttermilk biscuit without becoming molten when heated. Something that would taste good wrapped on waxed paper after it has oozed out the side of your biscuit and solidified.

A note on lightness & flakiness: The original author of this recipe likes her biscuits a bit more flaky and light than I was looking for, so I kneaded my dough a bit more than she called for. I wanted a somewhat dense biscuit; if you, like my DH, want lighter biscuits, knead less.

Eastern North Carolina Cheese Biscuits
Adapted from thoroughly researched and vetted recipe for Appalacian Cat Head Biscuits

2 1/4 c. All Purpose flour
3/4 tsp. Kosher salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. baking powder
4 1/2 Tbsp. chilled unsalted butter
1 c. buttermilk
Stout cheddar-like cheese

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F and spray a baking sheet with nonstick spray.

Mix the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl.

Add the butter a piece at a time to the dry ingredients with a pastry cutter until you have a mixture the consistency of coarse cornmeal. Although I’m sure the writer of the original recipe would cringe, I very rarely bake, don’t own a pastry cutter, and no one in my life trusts me to dual-wield knives without losing a finger or two like the recipe called for alternately. So, I beat the crap out of the butter with a metal potato masher and hands that I periodically chilled in the freezer until the right consistency was reached. Whatever works.

Make a well in the center of the dry mixture and add the buttermilk. Gently scrape the sides of the bowl and fold the mixture until barely combined. Don’t mix it to death, just incorporate all the dry wispy bits of flour from the sides of the bowl. The dough will be lumpy, sticky in places and shaggy around the edges. This dough is not pretty and to the baking uninitiated like me, will look like it is not going to work. Pick the dough up and knead it carefully in the bowl, turning over with each pass, 3-5 times (I did 5, the original author stuck to 3), until almost all the mixture forms a cohesive mass. Don’t knead any more, or you will get hockey pucks.

To form the biscuits, pinch off a ball of dough about 2 1/2 inches around and form into a thick free-form patty. This recipe should yield 6 large biscuits. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown.

Slice and serve with sturdy cheddar-like cheese, heating in the microwave until just-melted.

The Best Damn Grits I’ve Ever Tasted

These grits are good. Like jump-up-and-smack-yo-momma good. Better than the stone ground fancified grits at my favorite restaurant good. And the best part? I can have them any time I please. This is another comfort dish my DH has taken and made his own. Love it when he does that.

Chris’ Bomb-Ass Grits

2 cups milk (we use 2% Horizon Farms Organic)
2 cups water
1 cup yellow grits (we used Arrowhead Farms organic yellow corn grits)
3/4 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1 Tbsp. unsalted butter
3 Tbsp. grated parmesan
1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes

Pour the milk and water into a saucepan on medium-high. Cover & wait for the milk to boil. When it does, add the grits & salt and kick the heat down to medium. Stir constantly (yes, constantly means what you think it does) until the grits look like a thick soup, approximately 8 mins.

Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring only every 2-3 minutes until the grits thicken and fall nicely from the spoon, 7-8 minutes. You’re not looking for crazy thick here, just a nice thick but not concrete consistency.

When the grits reach that golden consistency, start stirring constantly for a little longer until they become creamy, fluffy & soft. Turn off the heat.

Add the parmesan, butter, pepper & red pepper flakes and stir to combine. Taste for salt and add if needed.

Serve with anything. We’ve had them with a great slow cooked ragout of mini bell peppers, onion and swiss chard and a plain topping of fire roasted tomatoes with kale.

To make the pepper & onion ragout:  slice 1 pint mini bell peppers into 1/4 inch thick rings, 2 cloves garlic and 2 small white onions into thin slices. Sautee, stirring frequently to avoid burning, over medium heat with 1 Tbsp. olive oil 20 mins. or until caramelized. Add 1 bunch chopped rainbow chard and 1/4 c. water and cook until chard wilts and water evaporates. Add 1 tsp. chipotle Tabasco sauce and sriracha (Chicken Sauce) to taste (for me, that’s a turn of the pan and a half). Salt & pepper to taste.

Serve over grits with thick batons of home made bacon.

If by some miracle you happen to have any leftovers, try this recipe inspired by Carla from Top Chef:

Fried Grit Fritters

Heat a medium pan on medium-high heat. Add 1 Tbsp. olive oil.

Take roughly 1/4 cup of your now solidified grits and dump them on a plate. Carefully with either your hands or a spoon, smash and spread the grits out until they look like a free form pancake about 1/2 inch thick. It doesn’t matter if you have little cracks here and there; you’re looking for something that will more or less stay together in the pan.

Transfer carefully to the pan and fry until golden brown. Flip & repeat.

This treatment wakes the leftover grits up and gives them a pleasant, almost nutty taste.

Pickle Me Pink Salad

Wondering what to do with all the pickled beets you just made? Well so was I, so I whipped up a little light salad to use up some CSA veggies.

Pickle Me Pink Salad

Oh no she didn’t go there; that recipe title is terrible! Ok, so I’m a dork, so sue me ;p

1 c. bulgur wheat
3 cloves garlic
1/2 c. broken walnuts
2 Tbsp. maple syrup
1 grapefruit
1 Tbsp. dijon mustard
1 bunch spinach, washed & chopped
3 oz. goat cheese crumbles
3/4 c. sliced pickled beets
1/4 c. + 2 tsp. olive oil
Salt & pepper

Add bulgur to 2 1/2 c. boiling water, turn off the heat, slap on a lid and let sit for 30 mins.

In the meantime, slice garlic wafer thin and add to a pan on medium heat with 2 tsp. olive oil. Sautee until golden and crisp. Set aside and wipe the pan.

Put the pan back over medium heat and add walnuts. Toast in a dry pan until starting to color and smell sweet. Add maple syrup and cook, stirring frequently, until most of the syrup has evaporated. Remove immediately to a dish to cool fully.

In a large bowl, whisk together the juice of 1 grapefruit, dijon mustard and 1/4 c. extra virgin olive oil. Salt & pepper to taste.

Add the bulgur (drain if it is a little wet), chopped spinach, goat cheese crumbles and sliced pickled beets to the dressing. Stir & serve.

Makes a nice healthy meal for 2, with enough left over for lunch the next day.

Pickled Beets: My Father Was Right

Much-reviled beets are one of the few foods on Earth I find truly repulsive. I think they taste exactly like musty dirt and generally want absolutely nothing to do with them. And then came my crusade to eat more seasonably and locally and my decision to join a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) club. My CSA ships year-round organic vegetables that are sourced as locally as is possible/cost effective. Part of that commitment was bound to include trying new things. Enter the beets.

I remember as a kid thinking after the first taste made my taste buds want to retreat down my throat that beets must have been something you ate in the depression, because they were less hard than pebbles, and that anyone that still ate beets was a: ancient and had no taste left, or b: wanted to eat what they ate when they were little.

I’m fairly certain that an ancient person was the first to get me to try beets. Possibly my grandfather with Althziemers. Maybe it was only my father. I did think he was ancient, after all. (what can I say? I was a little kid. Being in your 30s was one and the same with being in your 60s or 80s to me at the time. Yeek!)

The first time I got beets, I was terrified. Beets, while a beautiful shade of claret, are gross. They taste like dirt. What the crap could I possibly do to them to make them edible?

I made pasta. My fresh beet pasta came out a beautiful shade of burgundy and I served it with a brown butter and poppyseed pan sauce, because everything is better with butter. And you know what? It worked. The beets were only slightly earthy; combined with the butter and some fresh shaved parmesan, they were great. And pretty.

I’m not scared of you any more, beets. You hear that? I’ve kicked your ass and lived to tell the tale.

Now I know, I can’t serve them in pasta every time I get them. I’ve also roasted and shredded them for beet and potato latkes, and they were great.

Every time I mention beets to my father and how I’m running out of the limited things I can do to disguise them, he tells me how great pickled beets are. I’m skeptical to say the least–sounds like some weird old people shit to me–I’m willing to try it for him. If for nothing else, but a reason to talk a little smack.

Pickled Beets
Adapted from Simple Recipes

5 beets (about 2 c.)
1/4 c. apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp. sugar
3 Tbsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
Salt and pepper to taste

Scrub beets and cut into uniform sizes so they will cook evenly. Boil for 15-30 minutes depending upon how large your pieces are, until a fork slides easily into them.

Drain and rinse in cold water until cool enough to handle. use your fingers or a paring knife to slip the skins off. They should come off easily. Discard the peels and slice the beets 1/4 inch thick.

Whisk the rest of the ingredients together to form a vinaigrette. Taste for seasoning and adjust to your liking. Salt & pepper to taste.

Add beets to the bowl and stir to coat. Let sit at room temperature 15 minutes, stir again, and let sit 15 minutes more.

The verdict: Well, shit. These are actually pretty derned good. The first bite tasted a little like dirt in a not unpleasant way, and subsequent bites tasted sharp and sweet. I could even eat these in a salad without dying. So, dad, you were right ;p.